The Hubble team publishes new photos of interstellar comet 2i / Borisov
The Hubble team publishes new photos of interstellar comet 2i / Borisov

The Hubble team publishes new photos of interstellar comet 2i / Borisov

The Hubble team publishes new photos

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Astronomers using the NASA / ESA Hubble Space Telescope have captured two new images of 2I / Borisov, the first known interstellar comet that travels through the solar system.

2I / Borisov was discovered on August 30, 2019 by Ukrainian amateur astronomer Gennadi Borisov.

Also known as C / 2019 Q4, the comet formed in a planetary system beyond us and was fired into interstellar space as a result of a close collision with a planet in its parent system.

2I / Borisov has taken the form of “ghostly” after starting to react to the warming of the sun. It evaporates as it approaches the earth, leaving gas and fine dust in its tail.

In October 2019, Hubble observed the comet at a distance of approximately 420 million kilometers (261 million miles) from Earth.

Comet’s new short distance annotations provide a clear view of the details and dimensions of the interstellar visitor.

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The first image, taken on November 16, 2019, shows 2I / Borisov in front of 2MASX J10500165-0152029, a spiral background galaxy that is 390 million light years from Earth. The image of the bright central core of the galaxy is blurring while Hubble was tracking the comet.

At the time of the observations, 2I / Borisov was 326 million kilometers (202.5 million miles) from Earth. Its dust tail originates in the upper right.

Hubble restarted 2I / Borisov again on December 9, 2019, shortly after his closest approach to the Sun, where he gained maximum heat after spending most of his life in the icy interstellar space. Image credit: NASA / ESA / D. Jew, University of California, Los Angeles.

Hubble restarted 2I / Borisov again on December 9, 2019, shortly after his closest approach to the Sun, where he gained maximum heat after spending most of his life in the icy interstellar space. Image credit: NASA / ESA / D. Jew, University of California, Los Angeles.

The second image, captured on December 9, 2019, is a re-observation of the comet near the Hubble closest to the Sun. After spending most of his life in the extreme cold of interstate space, he was sometimes subjected to a high degree of heating The comet also reached an impressive top speed of approximately 161,000 km (100,000 mph).

The second photo has 2I / Borisov 298 million kilometers (185 million miles) from Earth, near the inner edge of the asteroid belt. The comet’s nucleus is still too small to be resolved.

“Hubble gives us the best measure of the core size of 2I / Borisov, which is a really important part of the comet,” said Professor David Jewett of the University of California, Los Angeles.

“Surprisingly, our Hubble images show that its core is 15 times smaller than the one examined earlier, which suggests that it may be. The radius is less than 500 meters.”

“This is important because knowing the size helps us determine the total number and mass of such objects in the solar system and in the Milky Way.”

“2I / Borisov is the first known interstellar comet, and we want to know how many others.”

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The Hubble team publishes new photos of interstellar comet 2i / Borisov

The Hubble team published new photographs of interstellar comet 2i / Borisov – Astronomers using the NASA / ESA Hubble Space Telescope have captured two new images of 2I / Borisov, the first known interstellar comet comet.

2I / Borisov was discovered on August 30, 2019 by Ukrainian amateur astronomer Gennadi Borisov.

Also known as C / 2019 Q4, the comet formed in a planetary system beyond ours and was fired into interstellar space as a result of close collisions with a planet in its parent system.

2I / Borisov has taken the form of “ghostly” after the Sun begins to react to heat. It arrives near the earth leaving gas and fine dust in its tail.

In October 2019, Hubble observed the comet at a distance of approximately 420 million kilometers (261 million miles) from Earth.

The new short-range comet annotations provide a clear view of the details and dimensions of the interstellar visitor.

The first image, taken on November 16, 2019, 2I / Borisov versus 2MASX J10500165-0152029, shows a spiral-bottomed galaxy, 390 million light years from Earth. The image of the bright central core of the galaxy is blurring, while Hubble was tracking the comet.

At the time of the observations, 2I / Borisov was 326 million kilometers (202.5 million miles) from Earth. Its dust tail originates in the upper right corner.

Hubble relaunched 2I / Borisov on December 9, 2019, following the closest approach to the Sun, where he gained maximum heat after spending most of his life in the frozen interstellar space. Image credit: NASA / ESA / D. Jew, University of California, Los Angeles.

Hubble relaunched 2I / Borisov on December 9, 2019, following the closest approach to the Sun, where he gained maximum heat after spending most of his life in the frozen interstellar space. Image credit: NASA / ESA / D. Jew, University of California, Los Angeles.

The second image, captured on December 9, 2019, is a re-observation of the comet near the Hubble, the closest to the Sun. After spending most of his life in the extreme cold of interstate space, he occasionally found high temperatures . The comet also reached an impressive top speed of approximately 161,000 km (100,000 mph).

In the second photo, 2I / Borisov is 298 million kilometers (185 million miles) from Earth, near the inner edge of the asteroid belt. The comet’s nucleus is still too small to be resolved.

“Hubble gives us the best measure of the core size of 2I / Borisov, which is a really important part of the comet,” said Professor David Jewett of the University of California, Los Angeles.

“Surprisingly, our Hubble images show that its core is 15 times smaller than the one previously investigated, which suggests that it may be. The radius is less than 500 meters.”

“This is important because knowing the size helps us determine the total number and mass of such objects in the solar system and in the Milky Way.”

“2I / Borisov is the first known interstellar comet, and we want to know how many others.”

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