Spitzer observes the molecular cloud
Spitzer observes the molecular cloud

Spitzer observes the molecular cloud

News - Spitzer Observes The Molecular Cloud

Spitzer observes the molecular cloud–NASA has launched an impressive image of the Perius molecular cloud, a giant stellar nursery 600 light-years away in the constellations of northern Perseus, captured by the agency’s Spitzer space telescope.

The infrared radiation of the hot powder generates much of the brightness seen here from the Peraceous molecular cloud.

Star clusters, like the bright spot to the left of the image, produce even more infrared light and illuminate the surrounding clouds as the sun clouds in the sky at sunset.

Very little of the dust seen here emits visible light and, therefore, is more clearly visible from infrared observatories such as Spitzer.

To the right of the image is NGC 1333, a reflection nebula about 1,000 light years from Earth.

The proximity and strong infrared emission of NGC 1333 made it visible to astronomers as soon as possible using some infrared instruments.

Many young stars in the object are sending massive material into space.

As soon as the material is removed, it is heated and applied to the surrounding interstellar medium.

These factors cause the jets to radiate radially, and can be seen in foreground studies of NGC 1333.

An annotated version of the Spitzer image of the molecular cloud of Perseus. Image credit: NASA / JPL-Caltech
An annotated version of the Spitzer image of the molecular cloud of Perseus. Image credit: NASA / JPL-Caltech

Other star clusters that are seen under NGC 1333 in this image have revealed a fascinating mystery for astronomers: they include stellar babies, teenagers and adults.

A mixture of such compact times is very contrasting. Although many star brothers can coexist in tight groups, the stars always move and, as they grow, they move and diverge.

Finding such a compact mix of apparent times does not fit with current ideas about how stars evolve.

“This field tells astronomers that there is something we don’t understand about star formation,” said Dr. Louisa Ribul, an astrophysicist at the NASA Infrared Science Archive at Caltech-IPAC.

“The puzzle presented by this field is something that makes astronomers come back. This is one of my favorite areas.

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Spitzer observes the molecular cloud

Latest News-Spitzer observes the molecular cloud

Spitzer observes the molecular cloud: NASA has launched an impressive image of the molecular cloud of Perius, a giant nursery star cloud 600 light-years away in the constellations of northern Perius, captured by the agency’s Spitzer space telescope. The infrared radiation of the hot powder produces a much greater brightness than what is seen here from the Peresius molecular cloud.

Star clusters, like the bright spot on the left side of the image, produce even more infrared light and illuminate the surrounding clouds as the sun clouds in the sky at sunset. Very little dust seen here emits visible light and, therefore, is more clearly visible from infrared observatories such as Spitzer.

To the right of the image is NGC 1333, a reflection nebula about 1,000 light years from Earth. The proximity and strong infrared emission of NGC 1333 seemed to astronomers as soon as possible using some infrared means.

Many young stars in the object are sending massive material into space. As soon as the material is removed, it is heated and applied to the surrounding interstellar medium. These factors cause the jet to radiate radially, and can be seen in the foreground study of NGC 1333.

An annotated version of the Spitzer image of the molecular cloud of Perseus. Image credit: NASA / JPL-Caltech
An annotated version of the Spitzer image of the molecular cloud of Perseus. Image credit: NASA / JPL-Caltech

Other star clusters seen under NGC 1333 in this image have revealed a fascinating secret for astronomers: they include children, teenagers and stellar adults. The mixture of these compact times is very opposite. Although many star brothers can coexist in tight groups, the stars always grow and, as they grow, they move and change.

Discovering such a compact mix of apparent times does not fit with current ideas about how stars evolve. “This field tells astronomers that there is something we don’t understand about star formation,” said Dr. Astrophysicist, astrophysicist at the NASA Infrared Science Archive at Caltech-IPAC. Louisa Ribul said. “The puzzle presented by this field is something that returns to astronomers. This is one of my favorite areas.

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