Progress of science and technology since 1945: development and impact

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Progress of science and technology since 1945: development and impact


Since 1945 progress of science and technology

Progress of science and technology since 1945: development and impact – Science and technology since 1945 Have you ever seen a snowball on a hill? He usually puts ice on his path, essentially running over someone before he gets bigger and bigger. In many ways, the advance of science and technology since the Second World War (World War II) has acted like that snowball: some small advances and technological advances have resulted in even more innovation and new devices that reach the market Are. Fast pace every day.

This is how we can handle computers in just half a century to connect machines to the size of an apartment. This lesson will detail some amazing advances in the world of science and technology since World War II.

Communication Communication and dissemination of information is now so ubiquitous that we rarely realize the continuous flow of information. Before World War II, radio was the main form of home communication equipment in most people’s homes. There were televisions, but in general they were very expensive and had few programming options. Television exploded in popularity in the 1950s, allowing people to see important events as they occurred in real time.

For example, many Americans saw Neil Armstrong landing on the moon in 1969 from the comfort of his own sofa. Similarly, the coronation of Queen Elizabeth II in 1953 allowed many British residents to witness the pomp and circumstances surrounding the royal coronation for the first time.


As the decade began, television technology improved more and more, as color television replaced original black and white television in the 1970s. Accessories such as cassette recorders (VCR) were mounted on the screen and the definitions fell. In the 1990s, high-definition (HD) televisions reached the market, producing a clearly sharper and more vibrant image than before, although before HD televisions became household items in the United States. It has been almost a decade.

The telephone experienced an equally rapid increase in use and technological development after World War II. With the invention of Alexander Graham Bell at the end of the 19th century, telephones became increasingly popular and the telegraph was largely replaced by World War II, with around 30 million telephones in service in 1948. After the World War II, the use of the phone continued to expand rapidly and until the 1970s. 100 million phones were in use.

The next significant advance in telephone communication occurred in the 1990s with the proliferation of cell phones. Although portable and in-vehicle phones were used since the 1940s, the first true cell phones (that is, one that a pedestrian could carry with them) did not arrive until the 1980s, and they were still relatively large. . They were Clooney items. They were very expensive for the average person. This changed in the 1990s as cell phones became smaller, faster and cheaper.

The proliferation of text messages in the early 2000s transformed the cell phone into a multipurpose device. The creation of smartphones, and especially Apple’s iPhone, which essentially converts cell phones into computers, has completely replaced cell phones, accessing the world of information on a device that only decades ago. It is used to make calls. telephone

Transport World Transport has seen similar improvements in technology since World War II, although not nearly the same level of innovation. In fact, our main modes of transport (cars, airplanes, trains or ships) are the same, although all have undergone serious changes to improve safety and efficiency.

Progress of science and technology since 1945: development and impact
 – Science and technology since 1945
Have you ever seen a snowball rolling on a hill? Usually, he puts the ice in his path, before it gets bigger and bigger, essentially running over someone. In many ways, the advancement of science and technology since World War II (World War II) has acted like that snowball: some small technological advances and advances have resulted in even more innovation and new devices that come to market . Fast pace every day.

This is how we can handle computers in just half a century to connect machines to the size of an apartment. This lesson will expand some of these amazing advances in the world of science and technology since World War II.

Communication
Communication and dissemination of information are now so ubiquitous that we rarely realize the continuous flow of information. Before World War II, radio was the main form of home communication equipment in most people’s homes. There were televisions, but in general they were very expensive and had few programming options. Television exploded in popularity in the 1950s, allowing people to see important events as they occurred in real time.

For example, many Americans saw Neil Armstrong landing on the moon in 1969 from the comfort of his own sofa. Similarly, the coronation of Queen Elizabeth II in 1953 allowed many British residents to witness the pomp and circumstances surrounding the royal coronation for the first time.


As the decades began, television technology became increasingly better as color television replaced original black and white televisions in the 1970s. Accessories such as cassette recorders (VCR) grew at as the screens and definitions were locked. In the 1990s, high-definition (HD) televisions arrived on the market that produced a clearly sharper and more vibrant image than before, although before HD televisions became household items in the United States. It took almost a decade.

Telephones also experienced an equally rapid growth in use and technological development after World War II. By his invention of Alexander Graham Bell in the late nineteenth century, telephones became increasingly popular and the telegraph was largely replaced by World War II, in 1948 there were approximately 30 million telephones in service. After World War II, phone use continued to expand rapidly and until the 1970s. 100 million phones were in use.

The next important advance in telephone communication occurred in the 1990s with the proliferation of cell phones. Although portable and in-vehicle phones had been used since the 1940s, the first true cell phones (that is, one that the pedestrian could carry with them) did not arrive until the 1980s, and they were still relatively large. They were Clooney objects. They were too expensive for the average person. This changed in the 1990s as cell phones became smaller, faster and cheaper.

The proliferation of text messages in the early 2000s transformed the cell phone into a multipurpose device. The creation of smartphones, and most notably Apple’s iPhone, which essentially turned cell phones into computers, has completely replaced cell phones, accessing the world of information on a device that only a few decades ago were used to make phone calls.

Transport
The world of transport has seen similar improvements in technology since World War II, although not nearly the same level of innovation. In fact, our main modes of transport (cars, airplanes, trains or ships) remain the same, although all have undergone serious changes to improve safety and efficiency.

Science and technology since 1945 - Have you ever seen a snowball on a hill? Usually, he puts ice on his way, essentially he puts himself on top of someone before he gets bigger and bigger. In many ways, the advance of science and technology since the Second World War (World War II) has acted like that snowball: some small advances and technological developments have resulted in even more innovation and new tools that reach the market . Fast pace every day. This is how we can handle computers in just half a century to connect machines to the size of an apartment. This lesson will detail some amazing advances in the world of science and technology since World War II. Communication Communication and dissemination of information is now so ubiquitous that we rarely realize the continuous flow of information. Before World War II, radio was the main form of home communication equipment in most people's homes. There were televisions, but in general they were very expensive and had few programming options. Television exploded in popularity in the 1950s, allowing people to see important events as they occurred in real time. For example, many Americans saw Neil Armstrong landing on the moon in 1969 from the comfort of his own sofa. Similarly, the coronation of Queen Elizabeth II in 1953 allowed many British residents to witness the pomp and circumstances surrounding the royal coronation for the first time. When the decade began, television technology improved in the 1970s, when color television replaced original black and white television. Accessories such as cassette recorders (VCR) were mounted on the screen and definitions fell. In the 1990s, high-definition (HD) televisions reached the market, creating an image that was obviously sharper and more vibrant than before, although before HD televisions became household items in the United States. It has been almost a decade. The telephone experienced an equally rapid increase in use and technological development after World War II. With the invention of Alexander Graham Bell at the end of the 19th century, telephones became increasingly popular and the telegraph was largely replaced by World War II, with around 30 million telephones in service in 1948. After the World War II, the phone continued to expand rapidly and until the 1970s. 100 million phones were in use. The next significant advance in telephone communication occurred in the 1990s with the proliferation of cell phones. Although portable and in-vehicle phones have been used since the 1940s, the first true cell phones (which a pedestrian could carry with them) did not arrive until the 1980s, and they still remain relatively older. They were Clooney items. They were very expensive for the average person. This changed in the 1990s as cell phones became smaller, faster and cheaper. The proliferation of text messages in the early 2000s transformed the cell phone into a multipurpose device. The creation of smartphones, and especially Apple's iPhone, which essentially transforms cell phones into computers, has completely replaced cell phones, accessing the world of information on a device just a decade ago. It is used to make calls. Transport World Transport has seen similar improvements in technology since World War II, although not nearly the same level of innovation. In fact, our main modes of transport (cars, airplanes, trains or ships) are the same, although all have undergone serious changes to improve safety and efficiency.
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