Planetary Scientists Make The First Global Map

Planetary Scientists Make The First Global Map Of Moon Rocks

Planetary scientists make the first global map of moon rocks. Using artificial intelligence and big data-based approaches, a team of planetary researchers from the Max Planck Institute for Solar Systems Research and ETH Zurich have analyzed a collection of more than 2 million high-resolution images and 136,610 moon rock falls . The global map is created. planning.

Maps of the global lunar distribution of rockfall in both globalization (70 ° N to 70 ° S) and polar projection (60 ° N to 80 ° N and 60 ° S to 80 ° S). Mapping results above 75 ° N and above 75 ° S may be less complete due to challenging light conditions (indicated by transparent white areas).

The rock fall density is given in quadrants per square degree, that is, the number of rock falls from 2 ° latitude to 2 ° longitude. The box shows examples of stonework and its tracks with different sizes.

Maps of the global lunar distribution of rockfall in both globalization (70 ° N to 70 ° S) and polar projection (60 ° N to 80 ° N and 60 ° S to 80 ° S). Mapping results above 75 ° N and above 75 ° S may be less complete due to challenging light conditions (indicated by transparent white areas).

The rock fall density is given in quadrants per square degree, that is, the number of rock falls from 2 ° latitude to 2 ° longitude. The box shows examples of stonework and its tracks with different sizes. Over a multi-million dollar period of time, the erosion process forms the smooth topography and forms the surfaces of the terrestrial planets and their satellites.

In the atmosphere, like the Moon, erosion is believed to occur primarily through space weathering. However, recently acquired high-resolution images have revealed a striking feature on lunar earrings: massive wear characteristics.

These include granular flows, landslides, slaps, and chills, as well as rock falls, a process in which the rock is released or ejected from the topographic elevation and the landslides fall, roll, and ascend.

Rockfall has carved tracks on the lunar surface, providing a record of the dynamic scrolling process. The characteristic combination of a displaced rock or a rock fragment and its trajectory allows an ambiguous identification from satellite images.

Scientist in the department and planets of the Max Planck Institute for Solar System Research. Valentin Bickel said: “The vast majority of migrants on the moon are between 7 and 10 meters in diameter.” In Earth Sciences ETH Zurich.

“Previous space probes have studied moons that were unable to detect such small features globally.” An example of a moon rock. In the new study, Drs. Bickel and his colleagues analyzed a collection of more than 2 million high-resolution images taken by the Narrow Angle Camera (NAC) aboard NASA‘s Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter.

They used a neural network in combination with advanced cloud computing capabilities to map the location and size of moon rock falls. They identified 136,610 lunar surface rock fall events in the latitudinal range of 80 ° N to 80 ° S, with an average spatial density of 2 Rockefels per 1 square per 1 °.

“For the first time, this map allows us to systematically analyze the incidence and causes of reefs that occur in another celestial body,” co-authored by the Department of Planets and Comets of the Max Planck Institute for Solar Research. Ursa Mall said.

The team found that asteroid impacts, directly or indirectly, accounted for more than 80% of all observed rock falls. “Most of the rocks are near the crater walls. Some rocks are displaced shortly after impact, others much later, ”said Professor Simon Lowe, co-author of the Department of Earth Sciences at ET Zurich.

Surprisingly, the researchers also found traces of rock fall events in the oldest lunar landscape, dating back 4 billion years or even earlier. Dr. “Obviously, it affects and modifies the geology of a region, for a long time,” said Bickel.

“The results also suggest that very old surfaces are still developing in other airless bodies like Mercury or the large asteroid Vesta.” The team’s article was published in the Nature Communications Journal.

See the first complete geological map of the Moon. New Integrated Geological Map of the Moon with Shaded Topography with Lunar Orbiter Laser Altimeter (Lola). This geological map is a synthesis of six regional geological maps from the Apollo era.

And updated based on data from recent satellite missions. It will serve as a reference for lunar science and future manned missions to the moon. Have you ever wondered what kind of rocks on the moon make up those bright and dark springs?

Well, the USGS has released a new official map to help explain the 4.5 billion year history of our closest neighbor in space. For the first time, scientists at the USGS Astrology Center in collaboration with NASA and the Lunar Planets Institute have mapped and classified the entire lunar surface equally.

The lunar map, called the “Unified Geological Map of the Moon”, will serve as the definitive model of the geology of the lunar surface for future manned missions and will be invaluable to the international scientific community, teachers and the general public.

The digital map is now available online and shows the geology of the Moon in incredible detail (1: 5,000,000 scale). This animation shows a rotating world of the new Unified Geological Map of the Moon.

A topography shaded by a Lunar Orbiter (Lola) laser altimeter. This geological map is a synthesis of six regional geological maps from the Apollo era, updated based on data from recent satellite missions.

It will serve as a reference for lunar science and future manned missions to the moon. “People have always been fascinated with the moon and when we can go back,” said current USGS director and former NASA astronaut Jim Reilly.

So it’s an amazing resource to look at the USGS that can help NASA plan them for future missions. To create new digital maps, the scientists used information from six regional Apollo-era maps, as well as updated information from recent satellite missions to the moon.

Existing historical maps were remodeled to bring them in line with modern data sets, thus preserving previous observations and interpretations. Along with merging old and new data, the USGS researchers also developed an integrated description of the Moon’s stratigraphy or rock layers.

This solved problems from previous maps where rock names, descriptions, and ages were sometimes inconsistent. This map is the culmination of a decade-long project, said Corey Fortezzo, geologist and lead author for the USGS.

This provides important information for new scientific studies by combining the discovery of specific sites on the moon with the rest of the lunar surface.

The lunar equatorial region data comes from stereoscopic observations collected by Terrain Camera on a recent SELENE (Selenology and Engineering Explorer) mission led by Japan’s JAXA aerospace exploration agency. The topography of the north and south poles was supplemented with data from NASA’s Lunar Orbiter laser altimeter.

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