NASA's Messaging Mission Performs Spatial Measurements Of Neutron Lives

NASA’s Messaging Mission Performs Spatial Measurements

NASA‘s messaging mission performs spatial measurements of neutron lives. Using data acquired in 2007 and 2008 during the Venus and Mercury flybys by NASA’s Messenger spacecraft, the researchers found that the lifespan of the neutrons was 780 seconds.

Atmospheric rays from the universe separate Venus’s atmosphere from neutrons that slowly fly into space. As neutrons move to higher altitudes, more time passes and more neutrons decay radioactively. Messenger counted the number of neutrons observed at different altitudes, allowing researchers to visit the home where neutron numbers begin to decline.

Using the model, researchers can estimate the lifespan of neutrons. Image credit: Johns Hopkins Applied Physics Laboratory. Atmospheric rays from the universe separate Venus’s atmosphere from neutrons that slowly fly into space. As neutrons move to higher altitudes, more time passes and more neutrons decay radioactively.

Messenger counted the number of neutrons observed at different altitudes, allowing researchers to visit the home where neutron numbers begin to decline. Using the model, researchers can estimate the lifespan of neutrons. Image credit: Johns Hopkins Applied Physics Laboratory.

“The lifespan of free neutrons provides a critical examination of standard models of particle physics, and also affects the relative abundance of hydrogen and helium formed in the early Universe, just minutes after the Big Bang, so it has broad implications , “Dr. Vincent AK, scientist at the Institute for Computational Cosmology at Durham University.

“Space-based methods offer the possibility of breaking the deadlock between two Earth-based measurement techniques.” Neutrons are normally found in the nucleus of an atom, but they quickly decay into electrons and protons outside the atom.

Physicists have previously used two laboratory-based methods: the “bottle method” and the beam technique technique to determine and determine the lifespan of neutrons. The bottle method traps neutrons in a bottle and measures how long it takes for their radioactivity to break down.

This suggests that neutrons can live on average for 879 seconds. The beam technique, which fires a neutron beam and counts the number of protons created by radioactive decay, takes about 888 seconds. While this may seem like a small difference, scientists say the difference can be huge.

Since a standard model of particle physics requires approximately 879 seconds of neutron lifespan, any deviation from this would cause a fundamental change in our understanding of this model.

Messenger placed a neutron spectrometer to detect neutrons colliding with atoms on the surface of Mercury as part of an investigation to determine the existence of water on the planet. On its way, the spacecraft first flew from Venus, where it collected neutron measurements for the first time.

“Although the messenger was designed for other purposes, we were still able to use the data to estimate the lifespan of neutrons,” said Dr. Jacob Kigeris of the Institute for Computational Cosmology at Durham University:

“The spacecraft observed a wide variety of heights above the surfaces of Venus and Mercury, allowing us to measure how neutron flux changes with distance from planets.” Using the model, the researchers estimated that the number of neutron messengers for the lifespan of the neutrons should be at their height above Venus and be between 600 and 1,020 seconds.

For short lives, too few neutrons survive long enough to reach the messenger’s neutron detector. With an uncertainty of approximately 130 seconds due to statistical and other uncertainties, they found that the lifespan of neutrons is 780 seconds, so the number of neutrons changes during the day and the uncertainty about the chemical composition of the surface of Mercury.

Researcher at the Johns Hopkins Laboratory of Applied Sciences, Dres. Jack Wilson said: “It is like experimenting with a large bottle, but instead of using walls and magnetic fields, we use the gravity of Venus to define neutrons several times for our lives.” The first spatial measurements of neutron lives were completed with the NASA spacecraft.

Scientists first discovered a way to measure the lifespan of neutrons from space, a discovery that can teach us more about the early universe. Knowing the lifespan of neutrons is important for understanding the creation of elements after the Big Bang since the creation of the universe 13.8 billion years ago.

Scientists from Durham University, USA And the Johns Hopkins Applied Physics Laboratory used data from NASA‘s MErcury Surface, Space Enforcement, Geochemistry and Ranging (MESSENGER) spacecraft to make their discovery.

When Messenger flew over Venus and Mercury, he measured the speeds at which the neutron particles were leaving two planets. The number of neutrons detected depended on the time it took for the spacecraft to fly relative to the neutron’s lifespan, giving scientists a way to calculate how long subatomic particles lived.

The findings, published in the Journal of Physical Review Research, may provide a route to end decades of ongoing stagnation that has seen researchers disagree, from a few seconds, to how long neutrons can survive. Dr. at the Institute for Computational Cosmology at Durham University.

Vincent AK said: “The neutron-free lifespan provides a critical examination of standard models of particle physics, and also affects the relative abundance of hydrogen and helmets that form on it.” The early universe just after the Big Bang, therefore, has widespread effects.

“Space-based methods offer the possibility of breaking the deadlock between two Earth-based measurement techniques.” Neutrons are normally found in the nucleus of an atom, but they quickly decay into electrons and protons outside the atom.

Scientists have previously used two laboratory-based methods, the so-called “bottle method” and “beam” techniques, to determine and determine the lifespan of neutrons. The bottle method, which traps neutrons in a bottle and measures how long it takes for their radioactivity to decompose, suggests that they can live on average 14 minutes and 39 seconds.

Using an alternative beam technique, which fires a neutron beam and counts the number of protons created by radioactive decay, provides approximately 14 minutes and 48 seconds, nine seconds, compared to the bottle method.

While this may seem like a small difference, scientists say the difference can be huge. Since a standard model of particle physics requires approximately 14 minutes and 39 seconds for the life of neutrons, any deviation from this would cause a fundamental change in our understanding of this model.

The artist’s schematic of how messenger provided data to estimate the lifespan of neutrons. Atmospheric rays from the universe separate Venus’s atmosphere from neutrons that slowly fly into space. As neutrons move to higher altitudes, more time passes and more neutrons decay radioactively.

Messenger counted the number of “observed” neutrons at different altitudes, allowing the researchers to travel to the house where the neutron numbers begin to drop. Using the model, researchers can estimate the lifespan of neutrons. Credit: Johns Hopkins Applied Physics Laboratory, USA.

Messenger placed a neutron spectrometer to detect neutrons colliding with atoms on the surface of Mercury as part of an investigation to determine the existence of water on the planet. On its way, the spacecraft first flew from Venus, where it collected neutron measurements for the first time.

Dr. at the Institute for Computational Cosmology at Durham University. Jacob Kygaris stated: Although Messenger was designed for other purposes, we were able to use the data to estimate the lifespan of neutrons. The spacecraft observed a wide variety of heights above the surfaces of Venus and Mercury, allowing us to measure how neutron flux changes with distance from planets.

Using the model, the team estimated that the number of neutron messengers for the lifespan of the neutrons should be at their height above Venus and be between 10 and 17 minutes. For short lives, too few neutrons survive long enough to reach the messenger’s neutron detector.

They found that the lifespan of neutrons is 13 minutes, with an uncertainty of about 130 seconds due to statistical and other uncertainties, such as the number of neutrons that change during the day and the uncertainty about the chemical composition of the surface of Mercury. Their estimated neutron lifespan is close to the range of estimates for the “bottle” and “beam” method.

Lead author of the Johns Hopkins Laboratory of Applied Physics, Drs. Jack Wilson said: “It is like a big bottle experiment, but instead of using walls and magnetic fields, we use the gravity of Venus to limit comparable neutrons to their lives.” As systematic errors in space-based measurements are not related to bottle and beam methods.

The researchers said their new method could provide a way to break the deadlock between existing and competing measurements. The researchers said that more accurate measurements would likely require a dedicated space mission around the planet Venus in the form of its dense atmosphere and high-mass trap neutrons.

They hope to design and manufacture a device that can make a high-precision measurement of neutron lifespan using their new TechnologyReference: “Space-based measurement of neutron lifespan using neutron spectrometer data on NASA‘s Messenger mission” by Physical Review ResearchThe findings were published in the journal Physical Review Research.

Recent Posts

1 thought on “NASA’s Messaging Mission Performs Spatial Measurements”

Leave a reply

%d bloggers like this: