Juno Spots, new circulating cyclone at the South Pole of Jupiter
Juno Spots, new circulating cyclone at the South Pole of Jupiter

Juno Spots, new circulating cyclone at the South Pole of Jupiter

Juno Spots, new circulating cyclone at the South Pole of Jupiter

Juno Spots, new circulating cyclone at the South Pole of Jupiter: NASA’s Juno spacecraft spied the new Jovian cyclone on November 3, 2019, during the 23rd Scientific Pass of the gas giant.

Juno was launched on August 5, 2011, with the ambitious mission of seeing Jupiter under dense clouds. On July 4, 2016, the probe finally reached the orbit of the giant planet.

Shortly after their arrival, Juno’s cameras discovered huge cyclones surrounding the Jovian poles: nine in the north and six in the south.

With each overflight, the data reinforced the idea that there were five gusts of wind spinning in a pentagonal pattern around a central storm at the South Pole and that the system seemed stable. None of the six storms indicated signs of allowing other cyclones to join.

“The data from the Juno Jovian Infrared Aerial Mapper (JIRAM) instrument indicates that we passed from the cyclone of a cyclone around a hexagonal layout in the center,” Dr. Juno’s team member, Dr. Said Alessaro Mura, a researcher at the Institute National Astrophysics of Rome. Italy

“This new addition is smaller in stature than its six more established cyclone brothers.”

“It’s about the size of Texas. Perhaps JIRAM data from future overflights will grow the same cyclone as its neighbors.”

New data from the JIRAM instrument indicates an average cyclone wind speed of 362 km (225 mph), equivalent to the speed found in its six most established polar allies.

This infrared image, captured by Juno’s JIRAM instrument on November 4, 2019, shows a new smaller cyclone (bottom right of the image) grouped around the south pole of Jupiter.

JunoCam of the investigation obtained a visual light image of the new cyclone.

“The two datasets not only shed light on Jupiter’s atmospheric processes, but other gas giants such as Saturn, Uranus and Neptune are also being discovered, as well as giant exoplanets,” the researchers said.

“It also shed light on the atmospheric processes of the Earth’s cyclones.”

“These cyclones are new weather events that have not been seen or predicted before,” said Juno scientist Dr. Cheng Li told the University of California, Berkeley.

“Nature is revealing a new physics about fluid movements and how the atmospheres of giant planets work.”

“We are beginning to explain this through observations and computer simulations.”

“Juno’s future overflights will help us understand how cyclones evolve over time.

Juno Spots, new circulating cyclone at the South Pole of Jupiter

Juno Spots, new circulating cyclone at the Jupiter South Pole

Juno Spots, new circulating cyclone at the Jupiter South Pole: NASA’s Juno spacecraft spied on the new Jovian cyclone on November 3, 2019, during the 23rd Scientific Pass of the gas giant.

Juno was launched on August 5, 2011, which included an ambitious mission to see Jupiter under dense clouds. On July 4, 2016, the probe finally reached the orbit of the giant planet.

Shortly after their arrival, Juno’s cameras discovered huge cyclones surrounding the Jovian poles: nine in the north and six in the south. With each flyby, the data reinforced the idea that there were five wind shocks that revolved around the central pole at the south pole in a pentagonal pattern and that the system seemed stable.

None of the six storms indicated permission to join other cyclones. Data from the Juno Jovian Infrared Air Mapping Instrument (JIRAM) indicates that we are going through a cyclone of a cyclone around a hexagonal design in the center, “a team member of Dr. Juno, Adesaro Mura, who is a researcher at the National Institute of Astrophysics of Rome This new addition is smaller than its six more established cyclone brothers It is approximately the size of Texas Sha JIRAM data of future overflow will increase cyclones similar to their neighbors New instrument data JIRAM indicate an average Cyclonic wind speed of 362 km (225 mph), the speed found in its six most established polar allies.It is equivalent.This infrared image, captured by the JIRAM instrument from Juno on November 4, 2019, shows a new small cyclone (bottom right of the image) grouped around the south pole of Jupiter Juncomme of the probe obtained a visible light image of the new or cyclone The two datasets not only shed light on Jupiter’s atmospheric processes, but also on other gas giants. The researchers discovered Saturn, Uranus and Neptune.

It goes, as well as the giant exoplanet. It also sheds light on the atmospheric processes of the Earth’s cyclones. These cyclones are new climatic events that have not been seen or predicted before, “Juno scientist Dr. Cheng Li told the University of California, Berkeley. A new physics about natural fluid movements and how atmospheres in giant planets It’s revealing.

They are beginning to explain this through observations and computer simulations. Juno’s excess of the future will help us understand how cyclones evolve over time.

Follow us on Twitter

BloggDude

https://www.tips16.com

This Post Has 2 Comments

Leave a Reply

Close Menu