Coffee is health food: Myth or fact?
Coffee is health food- Myth or fact?

Coffee is health food: Myth or fact?

Coffee is a healthy food

Coffee is a healthy food – Coffee is popular worldwide and studies generally reported inverse associations (moving in opposite directions) between consumption and the risk of chronic diseases & mortality.

But what about people who drink too much coffee and people with genetic variation can affect the way they metabolize caffeine?

“The rigidity of caffeine metabolism varies widely among people,” said Dr. of the Division of Cancer Epidemiology and Genetics at the National Cancer Institute. They said Ericca Loftfield and her colleagues at Northwestern University, Chicago, and the National Cancer Institute.

“Previous data from case-control studies suggested that drinking coffee may increase the risk of hypertension and myocardial infarction.

“However, these previous studies evaluated coffee consumption after having the disease and did not examine overall or cardiovascular mortality.”

Dr. Loftfield and his co-authors assessed the coffee consumption habits of 502,641 people using the demographic, lifestyle and genetic data of the UK Biobank.

“The UK biobank is a population-based study that invited around 9.2 million people from the UK to participate,” he explained.

“We use demographic, lifestyle and genetic reference data as a cohort of biobanks in the United Kingdom, which began in 2006 and ended in 2016, to estimate the risk ratios for coffee consumption and mortality.”

“We investigated the possible modification of the effect by the metabolism of caffeine, which is defined by the genetic scores of polymorphisms previously identified in AHR, CYP1A2, CYP2A6 and POR that impact on the metabolism of caffeine.”

Participants who drank were less likely to die of heart disease and cancer than non-drinkers.

Similar findings were observed for participants who drink ground, instant and decaffeinated coffee.

“Together, these findings suggest that the inverse association between coffee and mortality can be attributed to the components without caffeine and to reassure coffee drinkers,” the researchers said.

“In addition, research is required to understand the underlying mechanisms of the observed associations.”

The results appear in the JAMA Internal Medicine Journal.

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Coffee is health food- Myth or fact?
But what about those who drink too much coffee and those with genetic variation can affect the way caffeine is metabolized? "The rigidity of caffeine metabolism varies widely among people," said Dr. of the Department of Cancer Epidemiology and Genetics at the National Cancer Institute. He said Erica Loftfield and his colleagues from Northwestern University, Chicago and the National Cancer Institute.
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Sandra
Designer
5/5

Coffee is a healthy food.

“The rigidity of caffeine metabolism varies widely among people,” said Dr. of the Department of Cancer Epidemiology and Genetics at the National Cancer Institute. He said Erica Loftfield and his colleagues from Northwestern University, Chicago and the National Cancer Institute.

“Previous data from a case-control study suggested that drinking coffee may increase the risk of hypertension and myocardial infarction.

“However, these previous studies evaluated coffee consumption after the disease and did not examine overall or cardiovascular mortality.”

Dr. Loftfield and his co-authors assessed the coffee consumption habits of 502,641 people using the demographic, lifestyle and genetic data of the UK Biobank.

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“The UK biobank is a population-based study that invited around 9.2 million people from the UK to participate,” he explained. “The UK biobank is a population-based study that invited around 9.2 million people from the UK to participate,” he explained.

Life Style

“We use demographic, lifestyle and genetic reference data as a group of biobanks in the United Kingdom, which began in 2006 and ended in 2016, to estimate the risk ratio for coffee consumption and mortality. To.”

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Coffee is a healthy food.

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Coffee is health food

What is coffee?

"We investigated a possible modification of the effect by the metabolism of caffeine, which is defined by the genetic score of the polymorphisms already identified in the AHR, CYP1A2, CYP2A6 and POR that have an effect on the metabolism of caffeine." Participants who drank were less likely to die of heart disease and cancer than non-drinkers.

cyber-tech

What is coffee?

"Coffee is popular all over the world and the most commonly studied inverse associations (which go in opposite directions) are between consumption and chronic risk and mortality. But over those who drink too much coffee and genetics Caffeine with variation can affect the way metabolism is performed. "The rigidity of caffeine metabolism varies widely among people," said Dr.

Coffee is health food

What is coffee?

"However, these previous studies evaluated coffee consumption after the disease and did not examine overall or cardiovascular mortality." Dr. Loftfield and his co-authors assessed the coffee consumption habits of 502,641 people using the demographic, lifestyle and genetic data of the UK Biobank.

5/5
Coffee is health food

What is coffee?

"Together, these findings suggest that the inverse association between coffee and mortality can be attributed to ensuring caffeine and components without coffee drinkers," the researchers said. "In addition, there is a need to understand the underlying mechanisms of the associations observed in the research.

Coffee is health food

What is coffee?

Department of Cancer Epidemiology and Genetics at the National Cancer Institute. He said Erica Loftfield and his colleagues from Northwestern University, Chicago and the National Cancer Institute. "Previous data from a case-control study suggested that drinking coffee may increase the risk of hypertension and myocardial infarction.

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What is coffee?

"The UK biobank is a population-based study that invited around 9.2 million people from the UK to participate," he explained. "We use demographic, lifestyle and genetic reference data as a group of biobanks in the United Kingdom, which began in 2006 and ended in 2016, to estimate the risk ratio for coffee consumption and mortality.

Coffee is a healthy food and coffee is popular all over the world and inverse associations (moving in opposite directions) are commonly associated between consumption and the risk of chronic diseases and mortality. But what about those who drink too much coffee and those with genetic variation can affect the way they metabolize caffeine? "The rigidity of caffeine metabolism varies widely among people," said Dr. of the Department of Cancer Epidemiology and Genetics at the National Cancer Institute. He said Erica Loftfield and his colleagues from Northwestern University, Chicago and the National Cancer Institute. "Previous data from a case-control study suggested that drinking coffee may increase the risk of hypertension and myocardial infarction. "However, these previous studies evaluated coffee consumption after the disease and did not examine overall or cardiovascular mortality." Dr. Loftfield and his co-authors assessed the coffee consumption habits of 502,641 people using the demographic, lifestyle and genetic data of the UK Biobank. "The UK biobank is a population-based study that invited around 9.2 million people from the UK to participate," he explained. "We use demographic, lifestyle and genetic reference data as a group of biobanks in the United Kingdom, which began in 2006 and ended in 2016, to estimate the risk ratio for coffee consumption and mortality. To." "We investigated a possible modification of the effect by the metabolism of caffeine, which is defined by the genetic score of polymorphisms previously identified in the AHR, CYP1A2, CYP2A6 and POR that have an effect on the metabolism of caffeine." Participants who drank were less likely to die of heart disease and cancer than non-drinkers. Similar findings were also observed for participants who drink ground, instant and decaffeinated coffee. "Together, these findings suggest that the contrasting association between coffee and mortality can be attributed to ensuring components without caffeine and coffee drinkers," the researchers said. "In addition, research is needed to understand the underlying mechanisms of the observed associations." The results appear in the JAMA Internal Medicine Journal.
tech-world
Sandra
Designer

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