Betelgeuse Is Not Dimming Because It Is The explosion: It Is Only Dusty
Betelgeuse Is Not Dimming Because It Is The explosion

Betelgeuse Is Not Dimming Because It Is The explosion: It Is Only Dusty

Betelgeuse is not dimming because it is the explosion: it is only dusty, on February 15, 2020, a team of American astronomers visited Betelgeuse.

 

On February 15, 2020, a team of American astronomers observed a bright red Betelgeuse arecan, located approximately 650 light years from Earth, using the Devinney optical spectrograph on the 4.3-M Lowrey discovery telescope.

 

They discovered that if the surface of the star cooled recently due to attenuation, the star is much warmer than expected. The new calculations support the theory that Betelgeuse, like many red supergiant stars, is likely to remove some of the material from its outer layers.

 

This image, taken by ALMA in 2017, shows superstar star Betelges. Image by ALMA / ESO / NAOJ / NRAO / E. constitutor Gorman / P. Kervella. We see it all the time in the red supergiant.

 

And it is a normal part of its life cycle, Drs. Emily Levesque declared that she is an astronomer in the Department of Astronomy at the University of Washington, Seattle.

 

This image, taken by ALMA in 2017, shows superstar star Betelges. The red supergiant sometimes sheds material from its surfaces, which will condense around the star in the form of dust.

 

As it cools and perishes, the dust grains will move towards a little light and block our view. This is still true: astronomers expect Beteluse to explode as a supernova in the next 100,000 years when its nucleus collapses.

 

But Star’s attenuation, which began in October 2019, is not necessarily a sign of an imminent supernova. One theory was that the newly formed dust was absorbing the light of Bethelgeis.

 

Another claimed that the huge convection cells inside Beteluse had attracted hot material to its surface, where it had cooled before falling back inside. An astronomer at the Lowell Observatory, Drs. Philip Massey said.

 

A simple way to distinguish between these possibilities is to determine the effective surface temperature of Betelges. Measuring the temperature of a star is not a simple task.

 

Scientists cannot simply point a thermometer at a star and get a reading. But by observing the spectrum of light emanating from a star, astronomers can calculate its temperature.

 

The light of the bright stars is often too strong for a broad spectrum, but the team applied a filter that effectively ‘dampened’ the signal to be able to extract the spectrum for a particular signature: by titanium oxide molecules Light absorption.

 

Dr. “Titanium oxide can freeze and freeze in the upper layers of large, relatively cold stars such as Betelgeis,” Levesque said. It absorbs certain wavelengths of light.

 

And releasing ‘tablespoons’ of teltale in the spectrum of red supergents that scientists can use to determine the surface temperature of the star.

 

This comparative image shows Bethelues, also known as Alpha Orionis, before and after its unprecedented attenuation.

 

The observations taken with the SPHERE instrument at ESO’s Very Large Telescope in January and December 2019 show how much the star has faded and its apparent shape has changed.

 

This comparative image shows Bethelues, also known as Alpha Orionis, before and after its unprecedented attenuation.

 

The observations taken with the SPHERE instrument at ESO’s Very Large Telescope in January and December 2019 show how much the star has faded and its apparent shape has changed.

 

According to their calculations, the surface temperature of Bethergues was 3,325 degrees Celsius (4.01ren degrees Fahrenheit) in February 2020.

 

Several years before that dramatic temperature began, astronomers calculated that the surface temperature of Bethelues in 2004 was only 50-100 ° C colder than the temperature.

 

These findings led to the suspicion that the betelayuse is decreasing as one of the star’s massive convection cells brought hot gas from the inside to the surface, where it cooled.

 

“Many stars have these convection cells, including our own Sun. They look like the surface of a pot of boiling water,” Dr. Levesque said.

 

But while the convection cells in our Sun are many and relatively small, like red betel nuts the size of Texas or Mexico, like Bethelues, which are large, cold and have weak gravity.

 

The game is only three or four cells Large-scale convection, which stretches a lot on their surfaces.

 

If one of these giant cells had grown on the surface of Betelgeuse, the study authors would have reported a significantly greater decrease in temperature between 2004 and 2020.

 

“A comparison with our 2004 spectrum immediately revealed that the temperature did not change much.” We knew the answer was to have dust, “Dr. Massey said.

 

Astronomers have observed dust clouds around other red supergiants, and additional observations may reveal a similar disorder around Betelgeuse.

 

In recent weeks, Betelgeuse has really begun to shine again, if only a little. Even if the recent attenuation was not a sign that the star would explode soon, there is no reason to see it.

 

Dr. “Red supergiants are very dynamic stars,” Levesque said. The more we can learn about their normal behavior (temperature fluctuations, dust, convection cells).

 

And the better we can understand and recognize them when something unique like a supernova can occur. The findings will be published in the Astrophysical Journal Letters.

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