Archaeologists Trace The Long-Lost Capital Of The Ancient Maya Kingdom, Archaeologists Excavated The Site Of Lacanja Tzeltal
Archaeologists Trace The Long-Lost Capital Of The Ancient Maya Kingdom

Archaeologists Trace The Long-Lost Capital Of The Ancient Maya Kingdom, Archaeologists Excavated The Site Of Lacanja Tzeltal

Archaeologists trace the long-lost capital of the ancient Maya Kingdom, archaeologists excavated the site of Lacanza Tzeltal.

 

Archaeologists have excavated the Lacanza Tzeltal site in Mexico and discovered the ruins of a state capital known as Sak Tzi ‘(White Dog) from the Mayan inscription of the classical period.

 

Among his findings is a group of Mayan monuments, one of which contains an important inscription that includes rituals, battles, a mythical water snake, and a dance of a rain god.

 

Map of architectural groups and flow channels at the Lacanza Telteltal site, Mexico. Image from Golden et al, doi: 10.1080 / 00934690.2019.1684748. The Lacanja Teltal archaeological site is located today in the state of Chiapas, in southeastern Mexico.

 

Its perspective was first resolved from 750 a. C. and then it was occupied for more than 1,000 years. Sak Tzi ‘was by no means the most powerful in the Maya Empire, and its remains are modest compared to the most famous sites in Chichén Itzá and Palenque.

 

Anthropologist from Brandeis University Archaeologist Drs. Charles Golden said: ‘Sucking’ remains an important advance in our understanding of ancient Mayan politics and culture. The inhabitants of Sak Tzi harvested a variety of crops and made pottery and stone tools.

 

Archaeologists found remains of the possibility of a market in the city where these products would be sold.

Residents of the state also came to town to attend ceremonial games in which players held solid rubber balls, sometimes as heavy as twenty pounds, bouncing from side to side in a narrow courtyard using their hips and shoulders.

 

At the northeast end of the city are pyramids 45 feet (13.7 m) high and the ruins of various surrounding structures that serve as aristocratic residences and sites for religious rituals. The center of religious and political activity was Mukut Ton Square (Monument Square), a 1.5-acre (0.6 ha) courtyard where people gather for ceremonies.

 

A staircase leads to a huge platform, where the temples and the reception room were decorated and members of the royal family were once housed in court and probably buried. Sak Tzi had the misfortune to be surrounded on all sides by more powerful states.

 

For residents of the capital and rural areas, this meant wars and violent disruptions of daily life. Investigators found evidence that the capital was surrounded by steep walls to one side. On the other hand, masonry walls were built to ward off the invaders.

 

These fortifications are not always effective. The inscriptions on a monument date back to the time when at least part of the city was burned down during conflicts with neighboring states.

 

Ultimately, Suck Tuzzy’s survival has depended on his ability to make peace with his neighbors, and even play them as each other’s military prowess.

 

This is one of the reasons that is of great interest to the ‘Suck Tuzzy’ researchers, said Dr. Golden. Small is known for how the middle Mayans maneuver and manage to face constant hostility from the most powerful states.

 

Drawing of Panel 1 (left) and 3D model (right) of the Lacanza Tzeltal site, Mexico. So far, dozens of sculptures have been found at the Sak Tzi site among the ruins, though many have been damaged by looters or desecrated for centuries by rain, forest fires, and lush tropical vegetation.

 

The best preserved sculpture is a 2 by 4 foot tablet (0.6 x 1.2 m). Its inscriptions tell stories about a mythical water snake, described in the poetic couplet as ‘the bright sky, the bright earth‘, and various elderly rock deities whose names are not given. It also tells about the life of dynastic rulers.

 

Another inscription speaks of a mythical flood, while others list what are probably the historical dates for the birth and war of the various rulers, including a king named ‘Kaab Kaante’.

 

This interaction of myth and reality is typical of Mayan inscriptions and has a special meaning for ancient texts and readers. At the bottom of the tablet is a dancing royal figure. Maya believed that royalty could be transformed into a god or even a god.

 

In this case, the ruler is associated with violent tropical storms like the rain god. In his right hand, he picks up an ax that is the lightest lightning in the storm, which has a deified appearance called K’awiil.

 

In his left hand, the figure is wearing a ‘shovel’, a stone net, or a budgil used in a tug-of-war competition.

Archaeological success: discovered in the ancient Mayan empire … The patio of a rancher.

 

Archaeologists in Mexico were surprised to discover the long-lost capital of an ancient Mayan empire in the backyard of ocher cattle.

 

The discovery culminated in the search for the capital of Sak Tizi, an ancient Mayan kingdom that had been inhabited for more than 1,000 years. The city of Maya was unearthed by archaeologists from the Brandeis University and Brown University in the state of Chiapas, southeast Mexico.

 

Excavation at the site began in June 2018 and is so far the product of various Mayan monuments, treasures, pyramid relics, and a royal palace. But most amazing of all, the ancient city had become an active cattle ranch with archaeologists working to graze cows.

 

At the top of the excavation, archaeologists had to stop soaking the cows from their work and digging the wells.

Brandis associate professor of anthropology, Charles Golden, nicknamed the site with his colleagues Lacanja Tzeltal.

 

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The ancient Mayan Empire was more inhabited by 750 a. C. and was occupied for more than 1,000 years.

The ancient Mayan civilization flourished in this part of the world from at least 1500 BC and many cultural foci still exist throughout Mexico.

 

At the beginning of the 21st century, at least 30 Mayan languages were still spoken in the country. Since 1994, investigators have been trying to trace the capital of Sak Tzi.

 

Evidence of the lost city was first found in inscriptions and tablets found in other ancient Mayan excavations.

The Mayan civilization was divided into several states that were often distinguished in tribal lines.

 

Compared to the Mayan sites better known as Chichen Itza, the capital of Sak Tizzi is not as imposing or influential. But Professor Golden said the discovery would help researchers better understand sociologists of the ancient Maya.

 

In perspective, Professor Golden said that putting together an image of the Mayan civilization without sak tazi ‘is similar to drawing a map of medieval Europe without France.

 

He said, “This is a big part of the puzzle.” Professor Golden and his colleagues published their discovery in the Journal of Field Archeology. The article is titled Centering the Classic Mayan Kingdom of Sak Tzi ‘.

 

The study states: “The scale and architecture of the settlements in the Lacanza Tzeltal subcenter bear witness to the political importance of the site during the Classic period.

 

Although there is no complete map for any of the earliest known capital centers of the Lankange River Valley, the site is more detailed than Bonampak, Lakana, and Ayutla Plan, and is more likely.

 

Archaeologists were first alerted to future discoveries in 2014. Whitaker Schröder, a student at the University of Pennsylvania, was looking for excavation sites when he raided a street vendor who discovered an ancient Mayan stone pellet.

 

The archaeologist was taken to a local rancher, where the ancient city was hidden. But the work is not yet over, and Professor Golden said: To be truly successful, the research must reveal a new understanding of the ancient Maya and represent locally meaningful cooperation with their modern lineage.

 

The long-lost ancient Mayan empire unearthed in Mexico: Connie Waters – MessageToEagle.com – The lost capital of an ancient Mayan empire in the backyard of a Mexican rancher by an associate professor of anthropologist Charles Golden and his colleagues has been discovered.

 

The excavation, in collaboration with biologist Andrew Shire of Brown University and a team of researchers from Mexico, Canada and the United States, began in June 2018. Left, image of a bullet found at the site.

 

His findings include a troop of Mayan monuments, one of which contains an important inscription describing rituals, battles, a mythical water snake, and the dance of a rain god. He has also found remains of a pyramid, a royal palace, and a ball court.

 

The archaeological site called Lacanza Tzeltal, for the nearby modern community, is believed to have been the capital of the Sak Tzi state, which is today located in the state of Chiapas, in southeastern Mexico. It was first recorded in 750 BC. C. And then occupied for over 1,000 years.

 

Educators have been searching for evidence of Sak Tzi since 1994 when he identified its reference in inscriptions found at other Mayan excavation sites. This area is also mentioned in sculptures kept in museums around the world.

 

Sak Tzi ‘was by no means the most powerful in the Maya Empire, and its remains are modest compared to the most famous sites in Chichén Itzá and Palenque.

But Golden claims that the Sak Teezi ‘remains a breakthrough in our understanding of ancient Mayan politics and culture.

 

He tried to put together a map of medieval Europe from historical documents and read about a place called France. Essentially Golden and his team are based in France. “It’s a big part of the puzzle,” said Golden.

With the help of a food vendor, how did they find Sake Tzie?


In June 2014, searching for a dissertation topic, Whitaker Schröder, a University of Pennsylvania student who worked on the Golden project, saw Chiapas in an archaeological dig.

 

During the end of his stay, a man selling cards on the side of the road began to run, waving at him. Schroder thought he wanted to buy her food. A vegetarian continued. Finally, the day before he left, Schröder decided that he had nothing to lose and was dragged away.

 

A map of the excavation site. On the left is a horseshoe-shaped palace. On the far right, in the center, is the memorial plaza. Sincerely: Charles Golden..

 

The man was finally not interested in selling Shredder Carnitas. He reports that Shredder discovered an ancient stone bullet to his friend. He knew that Schroder, who had been researching in this field for many years, was interested in Maya. Would a graduate student want to see it?

 

The next day, Schroder and another undergraduate, Jeffrey Doberiner of Harvard, met with the seller’s friend, a rancher, convenience store owner and carpenter, and confirmed the tablet’s authenticity. Then he passed on the words Golden and Shire.

 

It took five years to negotiate the permit to excavate the property. In Mexico, cultural preservation, like the ancient Mayan sites, is considered state property, so ranchers are concerned that their lands may be confiscated by the government.

 

Golden and Shearer worked closely with him and government officials to ensure that this does not happen.

 

 

Daily life

The Sak Empire was relatively small, which today is the Mexican-Guatemalan border. It was unknown why it was called Sak Tuzzy, which means white dog.

 

Mangoes harvested a variety of crops in rural areas and made pottery and stone tools. Golden and his colleagues found what was probably the city market where these products would be sold.

 

Residents of the state also came to town to attend ceremonial games in which players held solid rubber balls, sometimes as heavy as twenty pounds, bouncing from side to side in a narrow courtyard using their hips and shoulders.

 

At the northeast corner of the city are the 45-foot-tall pyramids and the ruins of various surrounding structures that serve as aristocratic residences and sites for religious rituals.

 

The center of religious and political activity was the “Mukut Ton Square” or memorial plaza, a 1.5-acre courtyard where people gathered for ceremonies.

 

A staircase leads to a huge platform, where the temples and the reception room were decorated and members of the royal family were once housed in court and probably buried.

 

 

War and peace

Sak Tzi had the misfortune to be surrounded on all sides by more powerful states. For residents of the capital and rural areas, this meant wars and violent disruptions of daily life.

 

Golden and his colleagues have found evidence that the capital was surrounded by steep walls to one side. On the other hand, masonry walls were built to ward off the invaders.

 

These fortifications are not always effective. The inscriptions on a monument date back to the time when at least part of the city was burned down during conflicts with neighboring states.

 

Ultimately, Suck Tuzzy’s existence has depended on his ability to make peace with his neighbors, and even portray them as each other’s military prowess.

 

Golden says this is one of the reasons researchers are so interested. Little is known about how the mid-Mayans maneuver and manage to resist the constant hostility of the most powerful states.

 

Memorials to Sak Tzi

So far, dozens of sculptures have been found at the Sak Tzi site among the ruins, though many have been damaged by looters or desecrated for centuries by rain, forest fires, and lush tropical vegetation.

 

But the best-preserved sculpture is one that was originally shown to Schroder by a Carnits vendor.

Using a 2-by-4-foot tablet, his inscriptions tell stories about a mythical water snake, described in the poetic couplet as “the bright sky, the bright earth”.

 

And many unnamed major rock deities. It also tells about the life of dynastic rulers. Another inscription mentions a mythological flood, while others list whether there are historical dates of birth and war for various rulers, perhaps including a king named Cantt.

 

This interaction of myth and reality is typical of Mayan inscriptions and has a special meaning for ancient texts and readers. At the bottom of the tablet is a dancing royal figure. Maya believed that royalty could be transformed into a god or even a god.

 

In this case, the ruler is associated with violent tropical storms like the rain god. In his right hand, he picks up an ax that is the lightest lightning in the storm, which has a deified appearance called K’awiil. In his left hand, the figure bears the “menopala”, a stone or budgil net used in a ritual battle.

 

The team will return to ‘Sak Tzhi’ in June to continue using the ancient city with other equipment, among other devices, a technology called LIDAR (light detection and taker) in which a plane reveals architecture OR the drone is mounted on a search engine laser and topography, even under dense forest cover.

 

Members of the team would stabilize the ancient buildings in danger of collapse and document the statues that are still in the middle of the ruins. They will also explore further the area they believe to be a market, hoping to find more evidence of the goods sold and workshops where stone tools and other products were made.

 

Golden says scientists are paying special attention to close work with the local community. “To be truly successful,” he said, “the research must reveal a new understanding of the ancient Maya and represent locally meaningful cooperation with their modern descendants.”

 

The team’s article was published in the Field Archeology Journal.

Archaeologists Trace The Long-Lost Capital Of The Ancient Maya Kingdom
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